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The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights (ECHR)

The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR) was adopted in 1952. Traditional gender stereotypes remain deeply rooted in European culture and manifest themselves in daily practise. As a result, men and women still have unequal opportunities. The Council of Europe actively addresses gender-based violence and it recognizes equality between women and men as a fundamental human right. The ECHR has recently been litigated quite heavily in the area of economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to education, as you will note from the number of relevant cases. (Link to cases)

Article 14
The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in this Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.

Optional Protocol 1 of the European Convention for the Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms - Enforcement of certain Rights and Freedoms not included in Section I of the Convention

 Article 2 - Right to education

No person shall be denied the right to education. In the exercise of any functions which it assumes in relation to education and to teaching, the State shall respect the right of parents to ensure such education and teaching in conformity with their own religious and philosophical convictions.

European Social Charter (revised)

Article E – Non-discrimination
The enjoyment of the rights set forth in this Charter shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national extraction or social origin, health, association with a national minority, birth or other status.

Read more ECHR